All posts by Michael Brown

What stretches should I do after walking?

When it comes to stretching after your walk. There’s 10 stretches that we recommend to you. I call it the Cram 10, but the good thing is you only need to remember five of them, because the other five are the same. It’s just on the other side. Spend one minute doing each stretch, nothing fancy, nothing intense. It will just help. After a walk to try and lengthen some of those tissues after they’ve been contracting when you’ve been walking up and down those Hills.

Read More

How many steps should I do a day?

Hello, it’s Joanna from Cram osteopaths. This month of May is national walking month. So we’re encouraging you all to get out there and get a bit more active, especially now the weather should be brightening up and it will be a wee bit easier to get a daily walk in. We get asked all the time, how many steps should I do in a day? Everybody bounces about this idea of 10,000 steps a day and I would like to debunk that myth because I think it’s entirely relative to each individual, how many steps we should do.
The first advice is to get yourself a handy pedometer. I have one attached in my pocket, I got this on Amazon for £19.99, or you can do it on your phone or if you’ve got an apple watch, some people do it with certain technological rings. Once you’ve done that, what you can do is monitor over a week, what your average step count total is. For some people that may be 10,000, but for other people, it may be as low as 1000 or 2000 and then you want to set an achievable goal where maybe you do an extra 1000 steps a day for the first week, if you feel like you’re managing that quite well, you then increase that to an extra 2000 steps per week until you get to whatever your end goal might be. So if you start today, as I’m doing Tuesday and say, I really want to do 10,000 steps a day. You gradually build up to that and you don’t suddenly expect yourself to do 10,000. Cause believe me, you may do it for the first four days and then you’ll fall flat on your face, cause you’ll be knackered and you’re not enjoying it, then you go into that downward spiral. So we start slow, we gradually build up until we reach our goal and then we keep that steady goal, but definitely walking is one of the best exercises we can do for the whole body and for mental wellbeing as well. So we really encourage you all to get out and start a new habit this week.

Read More

How can I avoid texters neck?

Hello Joanna from Cram osteopaths calling all people that are addicted to their phone. Number one posture you see in any social setting is people sitting looking at their phones and having a horrible curve at the back of the neck. If you asked me, ‘is using your phone bad for your neck?’ The short answer is, ‘of course’ it’s not a good posture to sit in. But how can we avoid it when we rely so much on our phones? So there’s a couple of things you can do. One is if you’re just reading on the phone, try to have it at eye level. If it’s a quick text, just bring it out in front of you. If you find that difficult and you’re wanting to read a body of text. You can get a pop socket which fits onto the back of the phone. It’s a circular disc and it’s a nice easy way to hold your phone, it can also help to reduce wrist strain. If you’re using an iPad at home and you’re watching TV and also reading on the iPad a few cushions on the lap placing the iPad slightly higher up. You will still be looking down, but not at such a severe angle. Be careful though, especially if you spend an hour like that. There is risk of injury such as soft tissue damage, disc damage and also irritation of all of these small joints that we have in the neck.
So frequent breaks from using the phone and watching your posture and hopefully that will keep you right. If you are suffering with neck pain and you’re not sure whether it’s related to looking at flat screens too much or not then don’t hesitate to get in touch with us and one of our lovely osteopaths will take good care of you.

Read More

What to expect at an osteopath appointment

If you’ve never been to see an osteopath before you might wonder what to expect when you’re visiting us. 

Everyone’s treatment is individual to each patients needs, however here is a short video showing you the types of treatment you might have when you come in to see us a Cram osteopaths.

Read More

April is IBS awareness month

Hi, it’s Joanna from Cram osteopaths and this month it is IBS awareness month, and this might be something that most of your thinking, ‘IBS what’s that got to do with osteopaths and osteopathic treatment’.
IBS for those of you who don’t know is irritable bowel syndrome, which covers a wide array of symptoms, but generally people with IBS will suffer with stomach bloating or abdominal bloating and cramps, and also have a variety of issues such as constipation or diarrhea and a feeling of really just not feeling at their best. People coming to us may not initially present with IBS, but interestingly, a lot of people with IBS may also have some back pain and often they find that as their backs resolve with good osteopathic treatment, some of their symptoms become much more manageable with their IBS.
Furthermore, as Osteopaths, we don’t just look at the back. We also can look at what’s going on at the front of the body. So it may be that we actually do a little bit of movement through the abdomen and the underlying organs in the abdomen. That might involve some gentle articulation or movement or mobilization of the various organs. Some of the things, again that may present as typical IBS also may actually be shadowing what could be a colitis, crohn’s, celiacs or diverticulitis, and your osteopath will make sure that they are looking out for these.
So yes, IBS and osteopathy is definitely something we see lots of in clinics. If you’re a patient of ours and you haven’t mentioned to us that you’re suffering then let’s chat about it.
If you’re thinking about seeing an osteopath for relief of some of these IBS symptoms, get yourself booked in and one of our osteopaths will take really good care of you.

Read More

How can I loosen tight hamstrings?

Hi, it’s Joanna at Cram osteopaths. Today in the clinic I have been going over this stretch a lot, so I thought I would share it with you and it’s the simple seated hamstring stretch. If the hamstrings are tight it can actually cause some low back pain, which can affect those of you who are sitting at work all day, especially if you’re sitting all day and you’ve not got the best sitting environment. If your thighs are compressed by your chair and the chair coming all the way up the back of your legs this can cause lots of issues with pain and discomfort in the back of the legs and the low back due to lack of blood flow and movement through these muscles.
My usual advice of getting up frequently and moving around to encourage blood flow should help, but I would also recommend a very simple seated hamstring stretch. What you do is sit back in your chair and you’re just going to make sure that the heel can touch the ground. If you can’t then you move forward until you can comfortably put your heel to the ground and your leg is free of the chair. Then what you’re going to do is sit nice and tall and just raise up your chest, hands are going to be rested on the thigh and make sure your chest bone is up and straight. I can feel that coming right down through the limb. Hold it for three deep breaths and then release and repeat on the other side. Heel to ground hands on thigh, lean forward and push the chest bone up. Usually I’d say three deep breaths on both sides, three times each side and try to do it at least three times a day. Nice and easy to remember.
So if you feel you’re getting tight hamstrings or you’ve got a bit of low back discomfort and you want to try something before you give us a call, try that first. But of course, if the pain is not going away and you’re not sure what the actual cause is, we always recommend getting in to see us as soon as possible and we can have a really good look and get you feeling on your way to your better self.

Read More

Patient testimonial for IDD therapy


Please introduce yourself?
My name is Rhoda Calder. I’m 57 years old and I’m local to Glasgow from Newton Mearns.
What made you first come and see us at Cram osteopaths?
Back in October 2021, I actually ruptured a disc in my back and I had lots of physio and it took me a long time to get to the point where I was a bit more comfortable. Then in January 2022, I re ruptured the disc and because I’m going on holiday on Sunday I was looking for a very rapid treatment in order to feel better for my holiday so I came back to Joanna at Cram osteopaths who I’ve used successfully in the past and Joanna suggested that we try the IDD therapy, which has moved me from a pain score of 10 down to a one or two within 15 sessions.
How would you describe IDD therapy to others?
From my perspective, the difference in me over a very short time scale is nothing short of amazing. So, in my case I would confirm that it’s been a positive situation for me.
How did you find each treatment session?
Some of the sessions can be slightly uncomfortable, but you know on the whole I suspect it’s better and more comfortable than having a manual session to try and assist you in your pain.

Read More

What is a neck adjustment?

Hi Joanna here from Cram Osteopaths. I’m just giving Michael, who is my other half at the clinic, a little bit of neck treatment and we thought we would just go through it and show you what’s involved. Right now we’re just doing a nice bit of gentle articulation or movement of the neck joints.
This is usually a nice, comfortable technique, sometimes if someone is quite sore, there might be a little bit of discomfort but perfectly tolerable and we always say at this clinic let us know if you’re uncomfortable and we’ll change what we’re doing.
The next thing that we often will add in is a bit of gentle traction or stretching just to allow the relaxation of the neck muscles and all the other structures within the neck. Then the one that most people are worried about is neck manipulation. Before you have neck manipulation we make sure that you’re physically fit to have it in the clinic, but it’s nothing as scary as what people think.
We’ll just show you a quick neck manipulation on Michael. All it involves is bringing the head into a particular angle, we’re trying to do is keep it as comfortable as possible. So if the patient’s tense, we’ll help with that. I usually say ‘if you just focus on relaxing your head into the pillow and just let me do all the hard work here’, and that’s manipulation that’s into the left rotation and then we’ll come round and have a little look at the other side.
So same thing again we’re just going to go into a right rotation and that’s us there. A little bit of a stretch and usually for the neck that’s ample we would then go down and probably work through shoulders and upper back to do a more complete treatment. But hopefully that demystifies what happens when you come in to see an osteopath and how non-eventful a neck manipulation can be.
We’ll see you soon in the clinic.

Read More